Tag Archives: false gospel

Yoido False Gospel Church

yuidoLast week I took my first trip to Seoul, South Korea where I saw the church building for what Wikipedia declares to be the largest Pentecostal Christian church in the world with somewhere between 700,000 and 1,000,000 members. I snapped the attached picture as we drove by one time. Coming from a little congregation that has perhaps 150 people on a Sunday, those numbers are staggering. That is at least half as many people as reside in the entire state of Idaho where I live. Unfortunately, the Yoido Full Gospel Church should be more accurately called the “False Gospel Church.” Here are a series of  quotes taken from the “About Us” section of their web site. First, they proclaim the false prosperity Gospel:

All believers who are saved are set free from the spiritual, mental, and physical sicknesses that we may enjoy good health.

Secondly, they teach that our words have creative power:

Our lives will become what we say. First, proclaim the word of hope aloud. Second, unfold your faith with spoken words. Third, say something creative and prosperous.

These are the same deadly errors spread in the United States by false teachers like Joel Osteen, Joyce Meyer and so many others. It is sad to see that the same false gospel dominates South Korea just as it does the United States. The name of Christianity and, even worse, the name of Jesus Christ are used to mislead people by promising them false earthly hopes when all they can truly deliver is an eternity under God’s wrath. It is truly heart breaking. And a sobering reminder that one of the greatest mission fields in the world is among the people who call themselves Christian, but have never heard the true gospel.

Advertisements

8 Comments

Filed under False Religions

Jesus came to respond to the universal human need to…

DCF 1.0A couple of summers ago I did some research on a small-town, rural Idaho pastor for some friends. He turned out to be an absolute heretic. Last week, I made the mistake of listening to a new sermon by this pastor. Why? It must be similar to our seemingly natural response to look at a car crash. It did not take long for this pastor to remind me of why he is a heretic when he stated:

It is the singular most important issue that Jesus came to address…

OK. I will pause here and let you think about how you would finish his sentence. What was the most important issue Jesus came to address? Think…think…think…

Do you have an answer yet? Is that your final answer? OK, are you sure you want to see this pastor’s answer? Maybe you should look away? No? OK, here is his answer:

Jesus came to respond to the universal human need to know how to live well.

car_crash_2That was not a minor fender-bender, but an absolute, unmitigated disaster: “the universal human need to know how to live well.” Really? He spent a week of sermon prep and came up with that? God had told us how to live well about 1500 years before Jesus came. You may not have heard of these guidelines, but they were called the Ten Commandments. We could all live exceptionally well if we just followed that simple 10 step program. In fact, Jesus even confirmed those rules as words to live by.

There is only one teensy, weensy little problem. We cannot live by them. Not you. Not me. No my Roman Catholic friends, not Mary either. Only Jesus. That law is what convicts us, condemns us, and leads us to Christ Jesus that we may be saved by faith:

But the Scripture imprisoned everything under sin, so that the promise by faith in Jesus Christ might be given to those who believe. Now before faith came, we were held captive under the law, imprisoned until the coming faith would be revealed. So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith (Galatians 3:22-24).

Unlike the law-based gospel preached by this heretic, Jesus came not to tell or show us how to live well, but to respond to the universal human need to have our sins forgiven. We do not need more rules or excellent moral examples. We cannot keep the rules God had given long before Jesus arrived. We need a Savior. Jesus was and is that Savior:

There is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved (Acts 4:12).

If you church is teaching anything remotely like the message given by this pastor I listened to—RUN!

Comments Off on Jesus came to respond to the universal human need to…

Filed under False Religions

False prophets – 2 Peter 2:1-3

I spent a couple of days traveling for work this week which included several hours watching TV in the hotel. Since I do have cable or satellite TV at home, there are quite a few more programs to choose from than typical. As I scanned through the channels periodically, it was amazing to see the vast number of “Christian” TV shows. For all but one of those I shows I happened upon, there was a common thread—each of the televangelists believed in receiving direct, extra-Biblical revelation from God and in the false prosperity gospel. Here is the list of the various false teachers/prophets I hit upon:

We should not be surprised that these false teachers that promise us health and wealth are the ones that get most of the TV time and the money. The Bible clearly warns us that this will be the case:

But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction. And many will follow their sensuality, and because of them the way of truth will be blasphemed. And in their greed they will exploit you with false words. (2 Peter 2:1-3a).

If that passage of 2 Peter chapter 2 stopped there, it would be really depressing. Thankfully, we are encouraged by knowing that God is aware of these false teachers and their judgment is coming.

Their condemnation from long ago is not idle, and their destruction is not asleep (2 Peter 2:1-3b).

And, praise God for the Living Waters team and their faithful ministry to God, his Word, and the true Gospel. In my channel flipping, it only took about 20 seconds to realize their TV program was different from all the others because I heard the gospel immediately.

1 Comment

Filed under False Religions, Prophecy

The ditch on the left and the right – Ephesians 2:8-10

As humans, we have a tendency to go to extremes in either one direction or the other. And, as I seem to recall reading in a quote from Jonathan Edwards, Satan likes to push us hard toward those extremes. Satan does not care which ditch we end up in, just that we end up in a ditch.

We can see this problem when looking at two sets of Scripture versus. In the first passage we have:

For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast.

Awesome, excellent, reassuring words. The danger here is that we can fall on the side of cheap grace and think we can go on sinning so that God’s grace can abound. By no means! (Romans 6:1-2).

On the other side we have this passage:

For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them.

We can focus on this verse and zero in on the good works we are doing and believe they are at least a part of the reason God loves us and saves us. Crash! Now we are in the opposite ditch and Satan can again rejoice.

Thankfully, the Holy Spirit put these 2 passages right next to each other AND in the perfect order. As many of you likely noticed, these verses are taken from one continuous passage:

For by grace you have been saved through faith. And this is not your own doing; it is the gift of God, not a result of works, so that no one may boast. For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God prepared beforehand, that we should walk in them (Ephesians 2:8-10).

What comes first? Saved by grace through faith. What does it deny? Being saved by your works. What comes last and after you are saved? The reminder that you were created to go do the good works God has prepared. Perfect balance and perfect order. If we can can keep the whole passage in focus, we can avoid those nasty ditches on both sides no matter which way Satan tries to push.

5 Comments

Filed under Christian Life, Salvation

Law not Gospel. Making molehills out of mountains – Part 8

Do you trust the Bible or your heart and mind? Today we finally come to the end of the review of the blog article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On. If you would like to start back at the beginning of this series, here are the links to parts 1, 2, 3, 4 , 5, 6. and 7. We pick up near the end of the author’s hypothetical letter to her son who has revealed he is a homosexual:

God gave you the Bible, and he also gave you your heart and your mind, and I believe he’d like you to use all three. It’s a good system of checks and balances he designed (Glennon).

In previous installments, we demonstrated through her own words, that Glennon has decided to trust her own heart and mind over the Bible. She gets to decide which parts of the Bible are worth embracing and which parts are to be ignored or mocked. Nowhere does the Bible teach us that our own hearts and minds are on par with Scripture. Rather, God tell us this about our hearts:

The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it? (Jeremiah 17:9).

Glennon continues:

Prioritizing can still be hard, though. Jesus predicted that. So he gave us this story: A man approached Jesus and said that he was very confused by all of God’s laws and directions and asked Jesus to break it down for him. He asked, “What are the most important laws?” And Jesus said, “Love God with all your heart, mind and soul, and love others as yourself.” He added that every other scripture hangs on this one. So use that ultimate command as a lens to examine all other scripture. And make damn sure that you are offering others the same rights and respect that you expect for yourself. If you do that, you can’t go wrong (Glennon).

Yes, Jesus did say those things. It is recorded in Matthew 22:34-37 and Luke 10:25-28. (As an aside, be wary when people refer to the Bible, but don’t actually reference it; this can be a sign they are misusing it). The Bible teaches us that if we love God, we will obey his commandments:

For this is the love of God, that we keep his commandments (1 John 5:3).

You know, commandments like do not commit adultery, do not steal, do not lie, do not be drunkard, and, yes, do not commit homosexual acts. But, now we come back to the basic problem of sin that Glennon wants to ignore. Most importantly, do you see that she is giving you the Law, not the Gospel. Glennon has completed missed Jesus’ message—the true Gospel. You cannot love God with all your heart, mind and soul. The Pharisees could not. I cannot. Glennon cannot. It is the Law that shows us we need a Savior:

So then, the law was our guardian until Christ came, in order that we might be justified by faith (Galatians 3:24).

So, we can try to pretend that sin does not exist, but our conscious and our experiences with other humans will remind us this is a lie. We can craft an idol with our minds of a false God who overlooks everyone’s sins (except maybe Hitler and a few people like him perhaps). Or, we can fall on our knees in repentance and beg for God’s mercy for Jesus sake. Because Jesus died that horrible death on the cross to redeem sinners. And then, when we understand God’s forgiveness, we can warn others of the coming judgment and the only way of salvation—repentance and faith in the real Jesus.

Glennon’s view of Christianity is not mine. They are diametrically opposed, so we cannot both be right. I would suggest you really read the Bible and see what it says. Decide for yourself before it is too late because:

It is appointed for man to die once, and after that comes judgment (Hebrews 9:27).

Comments Off on Law not Gospel. Making molehills out of mountains – Part 8

Filed under False Religions, Salvation, Scripture, Sin

Everybody’s in, baby? Making molehills out of mountains – Part 7

In today’s installment, we continue our review of the blog article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On. If you would like to start back at the beginning of this series, here are the links to parts 1, 2, 3, 4 , 5 and 6. The author now begins to give us her interpretation of being born again:

What we do understand is that we are reborn. And here is what I believe it means to be reborn: The first time you’re born, you identify the people in the room as your family. The second time you’re born, you identify the whole world as your family. Christianity is not about joining a particular club; it’s about waking up to the fact that we are all in the same club. Every last one of us. So avoid discussions about who’s in and who’s out at all costs. Everybody’s in, baby. That’s what makes it beautiful. And hard. If working out your faith is not beautiful and hard, find a new one to work out (Glennon, emphasis in original).

That is not Christianity, but universalism (the idea that everyone goes to heaven). It is not worship of God, but worship of self. It is not believing in the real Jesus presented to us in the Bible, but believing in a make believe Jesus. That is not what Jesus taught about being born again (see John chapter 3 for that). The real Jesus taught about the eternal fires of hell:

And if your hand or your foot causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life crippled or lame than with two hands or two feet to be thrown into the eternal fire. And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell of fire (Matthew 18:8-9).

If “everybody’s in, baby” as Glennon claims, why did Jesus teach that many people will find destruction while few will find eternal life?

Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few (Matthew 7:13-14).

The reason Jesus taught about sin and repentance is because he believed that God’s judgment and wrath are real. And, because he believed God’s judgment and wrath are real, he was willing to die on the cross to redeem his people. And despite Glennon’s claim, not everyone is getting in to heaven. Do you want to believe Glennon or Jesus? And, I mean the real Jesus of the Bible, not some blond-haired, blue-eyed, surfer Jesus (h/t Matt Slick).

Glennon also tells you that you can put your faith in anything:

If working out your faith is not beautiful and hard, find a new one [faith] to work out (Glennon).

But our salvation is not about our faith, but what we put our faith in. Over the years, my pastor has given the analogy of walking out on an ice-covered lake. It does not matter one bit how strong my faith is in that ice. My faith will not hold me up. If I put my rock-solid, unwavering faith in ice that is thin, I will fall through. But, if I put my weak, trembling faith in ice that is thick, I will be supported. It is not our faith that saves us, but what we put our faith in. If we put our faith in a false Jesus, we will not be saved.

Finally for today, Glennon encourages us not to fear:

And if spiritual teachers are encouraging you to fear anyone, watch them closely, honey (Glennon).

The Bible teaches us that “the fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom” (Psalm 111:10). Jesus taught that we should definitely fear:

And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.

Jesus warned us to fear the false prophets who bring a false message from God:

Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves (Matthew 7:15).

The Apostle Peter warned us that there will be false teachers:

But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction. And many will follow their sensuality, and because of them the way of truth will be blasphemed (2 Peter 2:1-2).

As this series has repeatedly shown, the article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On repeatedly blasphemes Jesus and the true gospel. Do not be deceived by these lies. I want you to fear false teachers who bring these false doctrines of universalism. Be very afraid, because your very soul and all eternity is at stake.

Closing remarks tomorrow. In the meantime, go read all of 2 Peter 2 and hear the strong language Peter uses about false teachers. Is that message at all consistent with Glennon’s claim that “everybody’s in, baby”?

Comments Off on Everybody’s in, baby? Making molehills out of mountains – Part 7

Filed under False Religions, Salvation

What is love? Making molehills out of mountains – Part 5

Today I am continuing to review the numerous assaults on the Christian faith, the Bible, and the Gospel that were contained in the article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On. If you would like to start back at the beginning of this series, here are the links to parts 1, 2, 3, and 4. We pick up in Glennon’s article with:

Recently there was some talk in my Bible study about homosexuality being sinful. I quoted Mother Teresa and said, “When we judge people we have no time to love them” (Glennon).

But what does it mean to love? And we should look to the Bible for our answers on that question, not Mother Teresa. Was Jesus loving when he told people to repent of their sins and pronounced woes on the unrepentant:

Then he began to denounce the cities where most of his mighty works had been done, because they did not repent. “Woe to you, Chorazin! Woe to you, Bethsaida! For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes. But I tell you, it will be more bearable on the day of judgment for Tyre and Sidon than for you. And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day. But I tell you that it will be more tolerable on the day of judgment for the land of Sodom than for you” (Matthew 11:20-24).

Yes, of course Jesus was loving when he told people to repent. Why is that loving? Because if we do not repent of our sins then we will face the judgment and eternal wrath of God that Jesus also describes. I wonder, do Glennon and others like her who hold similar views actually believe in hell and God’s wrath for sin? Jesus believed in them. Do they?

Was the prophet Nathan loving when he went to King David and said:

Why have you despised the word of the LORD, to do what is evil in his sight? (2 Samuel 12:9).

That sound’s pretty judgmental! Sure, King David may have committed adultery and had a man killed, but Nathan seems to be too busy judging David to have time to love him. In 1 Corinthians 5, the apostle Paul writes:

It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that is not tolerated even among pagans, for a man has his father’s wife. And you are arrogant! Ought you not rather to mourn? Let him who has done this be removed from among you. For though absent in body, I am present in spirit; and as if present, I have already pronounced judgment on the one who did such a thing (1 Cor 5:1-3).

Paul not only judges this immoral man, but even scolds the church at Corinth for not judging sin:

 Is it not those inside the church whom you are to judge? (1 Cor 5:12)

Why was Paul so judgmental and encouraging the church to be judgmental? Does that sound loving? YES! It was the most loving thing that could be done by Paul and this church because this man’s eternal destiny was at stake:

You are to deliver this man to Satan for the destruction of the flesh, so that his spirit may be saved in the day of the Lord (1 Cor 5:5).

The good news is that most Bible scholars believe that this individual actually did repent, was  saved from that sin, and was to be welcomed back into the church (2 Corinthians 2:5-8). This is the very reason we are to pronounce God’s judgment of sin and call people to repentance and faith in Jesus Christ – so they will actually repent and be saved.

Glennon goes on:

I was immediately reprimanded for my blasphemy by a woman who reminded me of 1 Corinthians 6:9–10. But I was confused because this woman was speaking. In church. And she was also wearing a necklace. And I could see her hair, baby. She had no head covering. All of which are sooooo totally against the New Testament Bible Rules. And so I assumed that she had decided not to follow the parts of the Bible that limited her particular freedoms, but to hold fast to the parts that limit the freedoms of others. I didn’t point this out at the time, because she wasn’t a bad person. People are doing the best they can, mostly. It’s best not to embarrass anyone (Glennon).

What a second! Didn’t Glennon just judge this person’s use of the Bible? Who is she to say that this person has misused the Bible? This is such a common double standard regarding judgment that I do not think most people even recognize it. It is okay for her to judge, but not for others to judge. There is so much more to discuss in this paragraph that we will have to save it until part 6 tomorrow.

Comments Off on What is love? Making molehills out of mountains – Part 5

Filed under Jesus, Salvation, Sin