So Long, Insecurity: You’ve Been a Bad Friend to Us by Beth Moore

So_Long

One Sentence Synopsis

Despite admittedly not winning her own personal battle against insecurity, false prophetess and Bible-twister Beth Moore wants to sell you her formula for overcoming your own insecurities.

Rating:

1 out of 5

Recommendation:

If you are looking for a Biblical cure for your insecurities, look elsewhere.

Overview

The Bible contains the ultimate message of true security for Christians—both women and men alike. Our security is rooted in the Gospel—the life, death, and resurrection of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Christians have security in knowing that Jesus was “the propitiation for our sins” (NASB, 1 John 2:2) meaning He has turned away the wrath of God on our behalf. Christians have security in knowing that when we sin “we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous” (NASB, 1 John 2:1). Christians have security in knowing Jesus has gone to prepare a place for us and that He will come again so we may be with Him (John 14:2-3). Christians have security in the promise of “a new heaven and a new earth” where God will dwell among us and “He will wipe away every tear from [our] eyes; and there will no longer be any death; there will no longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain” (NASB, Revelation 21:1-4). Unfortunately, in her book So Long Insecurity Beth Moore has not addressed these true Biblical sources of Christian security but suggests looking to other sources. For that reason, and a number of others that will be addressed below, this is a book that Christians should reject.

In her own words, Beth Moore has targeted this book for all women, not just Christians:

This book is for any woman who courageously chooses [to overcome their insecurity] over her own strong compulsion of insecurity in a culture that makes it almost irresistible …  Maybe you don’t share my belief system, but you’ve been drawn to open this cover because you share my battle (Moore, pp. xii-xiii).

Much later in the book, she again reiterates that the book is useful for women of all faiths.

If you do not have a personal relationship with Christ … You can still find help within these pages, and I encourage you to see it to the end (Moore, p. 241-242).

This can get very confusing as the book often transitions from topics that address Christians only to topics for all women—often without providing clarity on which group is in view.

Somewhat surprisingly, Moore admits that she has not yet overcome insecurity in her own life:

But I have not won this particular battle against the stronghold of insecurity. Yet. God help me, I’m going to (Moore, p. 14).

Despite not winning her own personal battle against insecurity, Moore apparently believes she has discovered the formulas for success and is sharing them in So Long Insecurity.

I’ve been practicing them myself for the last several months, and I am astonished by how much progress I’m experiencing (Moore, p. 149).

She has been using some of these practices for “months,” but how are we to know that these practices will not fail her a year or two from now when life gets more difficult?

Improper Handling of God’s Holy Word, the Bible

While there are liberal sprinklings of Biblical texts throughout, this book is not based upon a study of the Bible, but rather personal, fallible experiences of sinful people:

I discovered resources that were infinitely more valuable [than the Bible or scholarly research books on insecurity]. I turned to people as my books (Moore, p. xiv).

Even when Moore does employ Bible verses, she repeatedly reads her own personal meanings into the texts (i.e. eisegesis) and uses them as proof texts out of their original context. One piece of evidence for the proof texting in this book is the use of eight (yes, 8!) different Bible translations. This Bible translation hopscotch is common among writers who want to find a particular wording, or even the use of a single word, to support their ideas. Rather than starting from the Scripture and drawing a conclusion, they start from their own conclusion and find a Bible verse that can be made to sound like it supports their ideas. They only have to find the right translation and rip the verse out of its context.

In an example from chapter 4, Moore demonstrates her inability to rightly interpret God’s Word. She claims to be providing examples of insecurity from the Bible, but gets most of them horribly wrong. She is either ignorant of the meaning of the Scriptures she employs, is reading her meanings into the texts, or probably both. Here she discusses the supposed insecurities of the Apostle Paul relative to the so-called super apostles from 2 Corinthians chapters 11 and 12.

I do not think I am in the least inferior to those “super-apostles.” I may indeed be untrained as a speaker, but I do have knowledge. 2 Corinthians 11:5-6 (NIV). Tell me that’s not insecurity. If you’re not convinced, take a look at what blurted from his pen only a chapter later: I have made a fool of myself, but you drove me to it. I ought to have been commended by you, for I am not in the least inferior to the “super-apostles,” even though I am nothing. 2 Corinthians 12:11 (NIV). Do you think just maybe he protests too much? In all probability, he fought the awful feeling that he wasn’t as good as the others who hadn’t done nearly so much (Moore, pp. 56-57).

Moore is trying to demonstrate that Paul struggled with insecurity. However, she not only completely misses the point of Paul’s teachings, but she also borders on blasphemy by saying that the very words of the Holy Spirit that are conveyed by Paul were merely “blurted from his pen” due to his insecurity. Paul himself says he is being “foolish” (i.e. sarcastic) in this section to prove the point that he is a true apostle. He begins this section by saying “I wish that you would bear with me in a little foolishness” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 11:1) and ends it by repeating that this is all foolishness: “I have become foolish; you yourselves compelled me” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul is absolutely secure in his calling as a “true apostle” (NASB, 2 Corinthian 12:12). Moore is either reading her ideas about insecurity into the text or simply does not understand the passage.

Direct, Personal, Non-Biblical Revelation

In addition to mishandling the Scriptures, Moore adds to the errors by repeatedly appealing to supposed personal revelation from God. She accepts revelation that she received directly and also accepts revelation from others:

I heard a deeper voice—not out loud, of course, but from the innermost place within me—say, Yes. Yes, indeed you are [beautiful]. The thought came out of left field. In fact, it shocked me. Listen, I’m not given to those kinds of thoughts when I’m in that kind of emotional funk. I knew the voice was not mine. It was Christ’s (Moore, p. 42)

Then one day I was walking and talking to God, and He made it clear to me that He loved me and I was placed where He wanted me (Moore, p. 123—from a blog post submitted by one of her readers).

One implication of her acceptance of all of this non-Biblical revelation is that the Bible is not sufficient for every good work that God calls us to accomplish. This is contradictory to the clear teaching of 2 Timothy 3:16-17:

All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work (NASB).

Another danger of Moore’s personal revelation is revealed in the following passage:

I’d like to replay it to you in the form of a dialogue because when it occurred, it was as if God spoke every word concretely and audibly to me. In reality, what I’ll describe was expressed in my spirit rather than in my physical hearing. After spending years in relationship with God, seeking what He’s like and how He operates in Scripture, I, like many people, can get a sense of something He’s strongly impressing upon me without “hearing” precise words. When thoughts come to me out of the blue that I’m convinced did not originate in my own mind, if they’re consistent with God’s character and sound like something He would say in Scripture, I usually assume it’s Him. Ultimately, time proves whether or not I discerned the voice correctly. If it produces substantial fruit, I know it was God and I was on target. If nothing comes of it, I probably misunderstood or accidentally ascribed it to Him. None of us are beyond confusing our own thoughts with God’s, no matter how many times we’ve been around the bend with Him (pp. 325-326).

This long quote from Moore demonstrates the real danger of listening to these inner voices rather than relying solely on God’s revealed will in His Holy Word the Bible. If no one can be sure it is really God speaking, why should we act on those feelings, hunches, or even words? Moore is convinced the thoughts “did not originate in [her] own mind.” However, if they later prove to not be from God, who were these messages from—possibly demons? Do you see the danger? We are warned in 2 Corinthians 11:14 that “even Satan disguises himself as an angel of light” (NASB). So, Satan will use words that sound like something God might say. Satan even used Scripture out of context in the temptations of Jesus (Matthew 4:6). While the Holy Spirit may occasionally provide special revelation to some individuals, the Biblical record shows that it is not normative.

Man-Centered Theology

The core idea of the book is that everyone has a God-given dignity, and losing our dignity has led to our insecurity. There is an element of truth to the claim that we all have a God-given dignity. However, Moore often minimizes the fallen, sinful nature of mankind which in turn leads to a focus on our worth rather than the worth of Jesus Christ.

Moore teaches that if we reclaim our dignity and recognize our value, we will have authentic security. There is good inside of us, we just need to overcome our limitations and win the battle against the bad inside of us. We should not consider ourselves inferior. If we recognize our goodness it will give us freedom, vision, and purpose:

Insecurity is about losing our God-given dignity. The enemy of our souls loves that. He knows that people who don’t value themselves won’t think they deserve dignity. He knows that only the person who really believes God will insist on having their dignity back (Moore, p. 148).

God had already brought me to the conclusion that part of any woman’s healing from insecurity inevitably involves reclaiming her God-given dignity (Moore, p. 153)

Forgive me for committing the flagrant sin of despising myself and considering myself inferior to others (Moore, p. 168).

The Creator of heaven and earth assigned us dignity and immeasurable value, and only when we finally accept those inalienable truths will we discover authentic security (Moore, p. 238).

It’s up to us whether or not we’re going to let the worst of us get the best of us (Moore, p. 58).

I’m simply telling you what I believe is the gospel truth: God can bring freedom and vision to your life because of those limitations that you would never have discovered without them. You can let your limitations make you either insecure or unstoppable (Moore, p. 83).

No! The gospel truth is not about giving you vision in your life. It is that God can free you from the bondage of sin through faith in Jesus Christ who died on the cross for your sins. The message of the Bible is not that we are merely damaged goods, but that we are dead in our sin (Ephesians 2:5).

Moore goes on to state:

The answer is to deal with the insecurity, believing that everything God says about us is true (Moore, p. 35).

The idea in the above is that we are basically good and worthy. But, what does God really say about us in the Bible? “Every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (NASB, Genesis 6:5) and “the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth” (NASB, Genesis 8:21). This is not just an Old Testament idea of wicked people. The New Testament states, “There is none righteous, not even one … there is none who does good, there is not even one” (NASB, Romans 3:10-12).

So, yes we should believe that everything God says about us is true. If we are an unbeliever, it should drive us to our knees in despair and make us cry out to Jesus to forgive our sins. If we are a believer, it should drive us to our knees in thanksgiving that our sins have been paid for by Jesus on the cross.

The Process for Restoring Your Dignity and Security

Chapter 9 details the foundation of Moore’s “process” for reclaiming our supposed God-given dignity.

In the next few pages, we’re going to present a pointed request to God, asking Him to help us reclaim our dignity and to prime our souls for security. Then we’re going to actively and deliberately receive what He gives us … I’ve purposely taken the guesswork out of the process (Moore, pp. 161-162).

We get to ask for a supernatural act of God Himself. We get to draw from the bottomless sea of divine strength. Even if you know very little about what the Bible says, I want you to lock your gaze upon these two verses and grasp their bearing on our journey.

This is the confidence we have in approaching God: that if we ask anything according to his will, he hears us. And if we know that he hears us—whatever we ask—we know that we have what we asked of him. 1 John 5:14-15

…it is God’s will for you to have your dignity restored…I can promise you that God wills for us to walk out the depth and breadth of our lives with dignity and security. Neither God nor you have anything to gain by your persistent insecurity (Moore, pp. 162-163).

If you’re willing to exercise the kind of boldness that excites the heart of God, you can go right ahead and thank Him in advance because you what that you’ve asked is as good as done (Moore, p. 163).

The core of her process is an approximately 10 page prayer that was developed from Moore’s supernatural wisdom and insight:

I’ve never before felt the leadership of God to put anything like this prayer journey in a book or study. I am convinced it was His idea to make good use of it…I’ve asked Him to equip me with the supernatural wisdom and insight to compose a prayer that will receive His resounding “Yes!” And I have no other choice but to trust that he has answered my earnest request (Moore, p. 164).

Find a private place where you can be undisturbed and undistracted for at least half an hour. If you can take a little longer to process the emotions with the meditations, the healing will be more substantial … but don’t let complicated arrangements keep you from accomplishing the goal … Get in a comfortable posture before God, someplace where you can sit, kneel, or even lie facedown … [following] examples throughout Scripture where people took on postures of prayer than reflected their sincerity. I want you to fully engage. Count on the absolute certainty that God will hear you and meet with you through the power of His Spirit (Moore, p. 163-164).

When you’ve set aside your time, place, and posture, begin the prayer guide that follows. Read it slowly, thoughtfully, and out loud as if it were rising spontaneously from your own heart (Moore, p. 164).

The only thing you have to do to make this petition your own is to mean it (Moore, p. 165).

Moore has turned prayer into a man-centered activity. If you do everything properly then God must obey. Here is a partial list of her requirements to reclaim your dignity and overcome your insecurity:

Ask for a supernatural act of God (Moore, p. 162)

Exercise boldness (Moore, p. 163)

Find a private place where you can be undisturbed and undistracted (Moore, p. 163)

Set aside at least half an hour; more if you want more substantial healing (Moore, p. 163)

Get in a comfortable posture that reflects your sincerity (Moore, p. 164)

Read her prayer slowly, thoughtfully and out loud (Moore, p. 164)

Make her prayer seem to come spontaneously from you own heart (Moore, p. 164)

Mean it (Moore, p. 165)

Claim the priceless traits as your own (Moore, p. 166)

Realize how valuable you are (Moore, p. 169)

Receive His lavish forgiveness (Moore, p. 169)

Actively and deliberately receive what God is giving you (Moore, p. 174)

Vow to keep receiving everything God is giving you (Moore, p. 174)

The above passages sound suspiciously like the “Name It and Claim It” prosperity teachers. If you follow this process, with the right kind of boldness and activities, then God will definitely answer this specific prayer for you with a “resounding ‘Yes!’” If the process does not work and you do not get rid of your insecurity, whose fault is it? Yours! This then becomes a new set of rules that you must follow to realize God’s purpose for your life. This is a teaching based upon law not gospel.

Conclusion

Despite the use of assorted Biblical texts, So Long Insecurity is not based on sound Biblical exegesis and does not lead people to the true source of Christian security—the Bible. Moore’s repeated errors in interpretation of Scripture, personal non-Biblical revelation, and a form of legalism make her a teacher that should be avoided. Instead, we should look directly to the Bible and its revelation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ for our security. “He only is my rock and my salvation, my stronghold; I shall not be shaken” (NASB, Psalm 62:6). The true Gospel can radically change lives and cultures, but Moore’s self-help plus God’s help to be a better person still leaves people as lost and fallen sinners who are without hope and no real security.

A chapter-by-chapter detailed review follows.

Detailed Review of Individual Chapters

The following is a VERY lengthy review of the book by chapter. The summary above should give you sufficient insight as to why Beth Moore’s writing and this book are dangerous and should be avoided. The following is designed to demonstrate with greater depth her false teaching and Biblical errors. Hopefully, the myriad examples will prove useful to someone looking to become better equipped to recognize many common forms of false theology, poor Biblical teaching and eisegesis. These same errors seem to have infected a vast number of popular pastors, writers, and teachers. Some of the text below may be repeated from the summary above to help with the flow of the discussion.

Introduction

While this book is categorized as being for Christian women, Moore makes it clear in the introduction that she feels the book is for all women, regardless of their belief system:

This book is for any woman who courageously chooses the latter [to overcome their insecurity] over her own strong compulsion of insecurity in a culture that makes it almost irresistible (Moore, p. xii).

Maybe you don’t share my belief system, but you’ve been drawn to open this cover because you share my battle (Moore, p. xiii).

This can get very confusing as the book often transitions from topics that address Christians only to topics for all women—often without providing clarity on which group is in view. While there are liberal sprinklings of Biblical texts throughout, this book is based upon Moore’s own experiences and the experiences of others:

I discovered resources that were infinitely more valuable [than scholarly research books on insecurity]. I turned to people as my books (Moore, p. xiv).

This book is not based upon a study of the Bible, but rather personal, fallible experiences of sinful people.

Chapter 1: Mad Enough to Change

The basis of this chapter is that Moore is “seriously ticked” (Moore, p. 1) at the insecurity that reportedly plagues all women She is ticked not just for herself, but “I’m feeling ticked for the whole mess of us born with a pair of X chromosomes” (Moore, p. 2).

I’ve got a loved one going through her third divorce. She wants to find a good man in the worst way, and goodness knows they’re out there. The problem is, she keeps marrying the same kind of man (Moore, pp. 3-4).

This is not a Biblical view of marriage and divorce. Where is the discussion of God’s hatred of divorce? The Bible does not teach that we can keep searching for the right kind of spouse if we do not get a good enough one the first, second, or third times.

I want some soul-deep security drawn from a source that never runs dry and never disparages us for requiring it … I need someone who will love me when I hate myself … Life is too hard and the world too mean for many of us to grasp a lofty sense of acceptance, approval, and affirmation (Moore, p. 10).

In this section, there is no reference to sin, God or Jesus Christ. If this is to unbelievers who are not covered by the righteousness of Christ, they should hate themselves and their sinful natures.

We are ever changing and ever spiraling up—or down (Moore, p.11).

There is no reference to a Bible verse that supports this idea, and it comes in a section of the things we should and should not do. This leads to a system of works righteousness.

The enemy of our souls has more to gain by our setbacks than by our succumbing to an initial assault (Moore, p. 11).

The identity of this enemy is not revealed. Also, Moore does not distinguish between believers in Christ who have the indwelling of the Holy Spirit and unbelievers who do not.

But I have not won this particular battle against the stronghold of insecurity. Yet. God help me, I’m going to (Moore, p. 14).

If Moore has not won the battle against her own insecurities, why should we read her book describing how to overcome them? Why should we believe God is going to help her? Why hasn’t God helped her overcome the insecurities already?

Chapter 2: Insecure Enough to Matter

This chapter begins with the statement, “We all have insecurities” (Moore, p.15).  The focus is on how different people manifest those insecurities.

Scripture claims that believers in Christ are enormously gifted people. Are our insecurities snuffing the Spirit until our gifts, for all practical purposes, are largely unproductive or, at the very least, tentative? (p. 16).

This claim is not supported by a reference to Scripture. What gifts? The New Testament describes a wide variety of gifts of the Holy Spirit.

The enemy of your soul has a tremendous amount to gain if you don’t deal with your insecurities. Don’t let him have that kind of victory. Let’s just stay honest and courageous, and trust that help is on the way (Moore, p. 16-17).

Again we hear of this unnamed enemy of our soul. How much can this enemy gain? Can he take our whole soul if we do not deal with our insecurity? Notice that the impetus is on us to not let him have the victory. We must stay honest, courageous, and trust. Trust in who or what? How will we know when we have done enough? It would be much better to trust in the finished work of Christ on the cross.

This morning I went on a walk to listen to praise music on my Ipod and hold the themes of this book out before God in hopes that He would speak to my heart. He spoke, all right (Moore, p. 18).

I cannot count the times God has had to tell me to cease trying to fix something that insists on staying broken (Moore, p. 20).

The above are just two of the many personal, extra-Biblical revelations that Moore receives from God.

If you know Jesus Christ personally, He has chosen you, too, and has appointed you to accomplish something good. Something that matters. Something prepared for you before time began (Ephesians 2:10). Something meant to have a serious impact within your sphere of influence (Moore, p. 18).

This text is reasonable by itself. However, as we will see in many passages through this book, Moore often veers off into a focus on our purpose (similar to Rick Warren) and on how our lives will get better if we have Jesus (as proposed by Word-Faith prosperity heretics like Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer).

The great news is that when we let God bring some wholeness to unhealthy propensities within us, we will not only make healthier relationships, we will also enjoy them immeasurably more … In your pursuit of God-vested security, the only relationships in your life that will suffer rather than improve are the significantly unhealthy ones (Moore, p. 26).

But, Jesus said that even our families can be divided by our faith in Him. In Luke 12:51-53, Jesus warned:

Do you suppose that I came to grant peace on earth? I tell you, no, but rather division; for from now on five members in one household will be divided, three against two and two against three. They will be divided, father against son and son against father, mother against daughter and daughter against mother, mother-in-law against daughter-in-law and daughter-in-law against mother-in-law (NASB).

Thus there is no Biblical guarantee that God will heal relationships in our lives.

You are not the only one to blame, but girlfriend, you are the only on you can change. God is willing. God is able. Let Him get to that terrified part of you that devalues the rest of you (Moore, p. 26).

This not only presents a wimpy view of God, but it continues to ignore sin. God and His holy law should show us how wretched we are and our need for our Savior. It is not just about valuing ourselves as we are.

Chapter 3: She Doesn’t Look a Certain Way

Continuing on the thesis of the previous chapter, Moore discusses how even women who we may think have it all (looks, wealth, fame, family) may also be dealing with their own insecurities:

Don’t miss one of the chief purposes of this chapter: Be careful who you covet. Be careful how you judge” (Moore, p.33)

Moore also states:

No person on earth can love you perfectly enough to mend a tear in the crimson fabric of your soul (Moore, p. 30).

Our souls are made of crimson fabric that can be torn and then sewn back together? What Bible passage was that taken from?

Making assumptions about who struggles with insecurity and who doesn’t based on what they appear to have going for them suggests how little we understand the nature of insecurity and what feeds it (Moore, p. 31).

While not based on a Biblical text, the above is probably good advice.

An injured soul is the problem (Moore, p. 33).

It is not an injured soul, but rather sin and our fallen natures that are the roots of our problems.

Thankfully, we don’t always get a scathing result when we perform a soul search. Sometimes we might actually discover that our motives are not that off base (Moore, p. 34).

This feeds the popular, but non-Biblical, idea that we are basically good people whose motives are sometimes “not that off base.” However, when we compare ourselves to God’s standard of perfect righteousness we are completely off base. The Bible says “all our righteous deeds are like a filthy garment” (NASB, Isaiah 64:6). A more literal translation of Isaiah 64:6 would state that our righteous deeds are like a used menstrual cloth.

Case in point: a woman I know got liposuction last year and decided recently that she looked good enough to get a better man, so shed dumped her husband. They have children, for crying out loud. Something’s whacked here (Moore, p.334).

Yes, there is something whacked here and it is, again, Moore’s low view of marriage as a covenant relationship. The problem in this example is far bigger than the children that Moore singles out. Jesus said in Matthew 19:6, “So they are no longer two, but one flesh. What therefore God has joined together, let no man separate” (NASB). This woman has not merely hurt her children, but has sinned against God Himself.

You and I are going to have to come to a place where we stop handing people the kind of power only God should wield over us. Change will not come easy. Old habits die hard. But we can make the radical decision to rewire our security systems (Moore, p. 35).

Moore often gives contradictory advice. Sometimes, as in the above, it is focused on how we have the power to change and find security. Other times she states it is something only God can do. This confusion is increased by the continual shifting between addressing only believers to addressing all people.

We’d still slosh around in self-doubt or worry over whether or not we’ll have tomorrow what we have today. Most of us would wrestle with how much we don’t deserve what we have, and that alone can make us feel insecure (Moore, p. 39).

We don’t deserve what we have—none of it! This continues the book’s theme that we are basically good people whom God loves. It is true that we should not worry about tomorrow because God cares for us (Matthew 6:25-34).

I’m on my way to freedom and bound and determined, God willing, to take some women with me (Moore, p. 40).

She is still on her way to freedom from insecurity, but supposedly knows that she has the secret steps to get there. Why should we believe she is on the right path?

If I don’t feel like I look good, somehow I rationalize that since God looks on the heart, He’s not the threat, so I don’t need to go to Him (Moore, p. 40).

And what does God see when He looks at our hearts? “The heart is more deceitful than all else and is desperately sick; who can understand it?” (NASB, Jeremiah 17:9). While Moore is addressing insecurity based on outward appearance, she is wrongly putting security in what is in the wicked, deceitful heart.

Although we may have something unhealthy deep inside of us, those in whom Christ dwells also have something deeper. Something whole. Something so infinitely healthy that, if it would but invade the rest of us, we would be healed (Moore, p. 42).

While there is some truth in this, the Bible does not promise complete healing in this lifetime. And, a little bit of truth makes for a more deceptive lie.

That, beloved, is our challenge. To let the healthy, utterly whole, and completely secure part of us increasingly overtake our earthen vessels until it drives our every emotion, reaction, and relationship (Moore, p. 43).

Is this challenge just for believers or for everyone? And this sounds like it is “part of us” rather than the work of the Holy Spirit in and through us.

Chapter 4: Good Company

The goal of this chapter is supposedly to provide examples of insecurity from the Bible. Unfortunately, Moore completely abuses the Biblical texts. She is either ignorant of the meaning of the Scriptures she employs or is reading her meanings into the texts; or probably both.

I feel sure that all our female troubles began with her [Eve]. But since the only real hint of insecurity I can find is her affinity for fig leaves, I’ll leave her alone. Insecurity often displays itself in a woman’s wardrobe, but who can blame Eve for grabbing the closest thing on a hanger? There wasn’t a darn thing in her closet. Not many women are secure enough to walk around for long without some kind of leaf (Moore, pp. 45-46).

Clearly there is a little tongue-in-check humor in the above. But Moore never discusses the horrible consequences of that first sin. Nor does she discuss that Eve was hiding from God because she was now a sinner—ashamed of herself and fearful of God. Moore seemingly wants to flip the story upside down and encourage sinners to not be ashamed of themselves and believe that God loves them just the way they are.

Saul feared the loss of power and admiration, and he quickly ascertained that David would be the one to try to take them from him. He didn’t quite get that God alone was in charge of his destiny and the only one who could jar that crown off his head…One thing that might have driven Saul to such distraction was that his feelings were so conflicted (Moore, p. 54).

Moore again completely misses key aspects of the Biblical narrative. Saul had already been told by Samuel that because of his sin “your kingdom shall not endure. The Lord has sought out for Himself a man after His own heart, and the Lord has appointed him as ruler over His people, because you have not kept what the Lord commanded you” (NASB, 1 Samuel 13:14) It wasn’t about Saul’s conflicted feelings, but about his continual sin against God.

In an example from chapter 4, Moore demonstrates her inability to rightly interpret God’s Word. She claims to be providing examples of insecurity from the Bible, but gets most of them horribly wrong. She is either ignorant of the meaning of the Scriptures she employs, is reading her meanings into the texts, or probably both. Here she discusses the supposed insecurities of the Apostle Paul relative to the so-called “super-apostles” from 2 Corinthians chapters 11 and 12:

“I do not think I am in the least inferior to those “super-apostles. I may indeed be untrained as a speaker, but I do have knowledge” 2 Corinthians 11:5-6 (NIV).

Tell me that’s not insecurity. If you’re not convinced, take a look at what blurted from his pen only a chapter later: I have made a fool of myself, but you drove me to it. I ought to have been commended by you, for I am not in the least inferior to the “super-apostles,” even though I am nothing. 2 Corinthians 12:11 (NIV). Do you think just maybe he protests too much? In all probability, he fought the awful feeling that he wasn’t as good as the others who hadn’t done nearly so much” (pp. 56-57).

Moore is trying to demonstrate that Paul struggled with insecurity. However, she not only completely misses the point of Paul’s teachings, but she also borders on blasphemy by saying that the very words of the Holy Spirit that are conveyed by Paul were merely “blurted from his pen” due to his insecurity. Paul himself says he is being “foolish” (i.e. sarcastic) in this section to prove the point that he is a true apostle. He begins this section by saying “I wish that you would bear with me in a little foolishness” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 11:1) and ends it by repeating that this is all foolishness: “I have made a fool of myself, but you drove me to it” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 12:11). Paul is absolutely secure in his calling as a “true apostle” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 12:12). Moore is either reading her ideas about insecurity into the text or simply does not understand the passage.

In addition to wrongly concluding that the Apostle Paul suffered from insecurity when compared to the super-apostles, Moore says that these super-apostles were also Biblical examples of insecurity. Wrong again! They were Biblical examples of false teachers who preach another Jesus and a different gospel (2 Corinthians 11:4). This is a far bigger problem than insecurity!

The fiercest enemy he [Paul] had to fight in the fulfillment of his destiny was himself … After untold wars with his own inner man, Paul watched as his wounded ego was wrestled to the ground by the Spirit of Christ, and up stood a person he had no inkling he could be. A stranger you might say, to the man he’d mirrored for so long. “By the grace of God I am what I am” (1 Corinthians 15:10). And his mission was accomplished (Moore, p. 57).

But Paul was NOT fighting a war with his inner man when he was confronted by the risen Lord Jesus on the road to Damascus. Paul was on his way to imprison the Christians (Acts 22). Paul was a hopelessly lost sinner until Christ found him.

Chapter 5: Rooting It Out

In this chapter, Moore discusses the fallen world we live in:

There’s no apparent end to bad news. Much of the world is racked with enormous debt and economic instability, threats of terrorism, wars, fallen heroes, rabid perversity, and violence for the pure pleasure of it … natural disaster … death toll so high we go numb … loved ones diagnosed with life-threatening diseases, and you’ve got yourself enough fear to dig a hold of insecurity six feet deep … Life is rough. It’s also beautiful, but if we can’t get some respite from its cruelty, we will never have the healthy vision to savor its tender beauty (Moore, p. 61).

This would have been a great opportunity to discuss the fallen world we live in as a consequence of our sin (Romans 8:20-22). It would have provided a great segue to our Savior and our hope for a new heaven and a new earth (Revelation 21:1) when He returns in glory and there will be no more “mourning, or crying, or pain” (NASB, Revelation 21:4). Unfortunately, Moore figures we only need to see the beauty in this fallen world.

For me, this is one profound reason that God, omniscient and omnipresent, has been the vital element in my healing. During particularly lonely or frustrating times, perhaps you, like me, have felt that nobody gets it. But He gets it better than we do. So many times He has shown me where I was coming from instead of the other way around (Moore, p. 63).

Do we just look for God to validate our feelings? Also, our biggest need is not to have God heal our pains, but forgive our sins.

Recognition is the first step toward letting God get to an issue and healing it. Get some things up there on the surface, and let God validate your challenges (Moore, p. 64).

What if our challenges are unrepentant sin or rejection of Jesus as our Savior? How do we know recognition is the first step toward letting God get to an issue. Did God wait for the apostle Paul (then known as Saul) to recognize the depth of his sin when he was persecuting Christians? No!

If you’re a mom who has suffered through a divorce, please don’t crawl under a rock of condemnation. Just realize the potential fallout and seek to counteract it with the power of a redeeming God and a community of support (Moore, p. 64).

Moore does not explain here what it means to have a redeeming God. He does not redeem our divorce. More importantly “Christ redeemed us from the curse of the Law” (NASB, Galatians 3:13).

I also pray that God will show you wonders unceasing. We who are in Christ are never hopeless, never without recourse or divine help, even when our bodies are weak …  Inviting even the worst and most unfair circumstances out into the spotlight sets the stage for a miracle. In the meantime, never forget that God still reserves the right to favor the suffering (Moore, p. 65).

How does this message help a person who has just been diagnosed with terminal cancer? Do they remain hopeful only in the fact that God can heal their disease? Whether God chooses to heal the believer or call them to their eternal home, our true security is in knowing that God is sovereign in all things. Paul recognized there was joy in both life and death when he said, “to live is Christ and to die is gain” (NASB, Philippians 1:21).

 Catholic graveside service of Keith’s elderly aunt (Moore, p. 69).

The Roman Catholic Church preaches a false gospel that teaches that we are not saved by grace alone, but by grace and our works. This is contrary to the Bible: “For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast” (NASB, Ephesians 2:8-9). Moore, however, falsely believes followers of the Roman Catholic Church are fellow Christians despite their denial of this essential doctrine of saving faith. In reality, they are “severed from Christ” (NASB, Galatians 5:4) by trying to add works to their faith for salvation.

No, you can’t have your loved one back in this lifetime, but you can indeed have your security back. That loss does not have to be permanent (Moore, p. 70-71).

Why does she focus on our security? We are secure in Christ and what He has accomplished for us on the cross. Moore needs to share the gospel of eternal life in Jesus Christ, not her man-centered method to regain your security. And, no, that security will not be permanent if you die in your sins.

If you didn’t get to be a child when you were young, you suffered a loss of innocence. As the apostle Paul inferred, children are supposed to talk like children, think like children, and reason like children (1 Corinthians 13:11). When they are forced to grow up too quickly, they lose something that no one can give back (Moore, p. 71).

This is more eisegesis by Moore. She leaves off the last part of the verse which states “when I became a man, I did away with childish things” (NASB, 1 Corinthians 13:11). This passage is not about loss of innocence, but about growing in faith, knowledge, and love.

Whatever you do, don’t reject the only One wholly incapable of rejecting you. “I have chosen you and have not rejected you. So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God.” Isaiah 41:9-10 (Moore, p. 77).

In this subsection on rejection, Moore continues with her Scripture twisting. This message from God in Isaiah was written only to Israel, God’s chosen nation during the Old Testament period. Jesus Himself warned that He will reject people:

Many will say to Me on that day, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in Your name, and in Your name cast out demons, and in Your name perform many miracles?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from me, you who practice lawlessness (NASB, Matthew 7:22-23).

Continuing on, Moore states:

I prefer the term ‘redeemed’ over ‘recovering wrecks’, but I’d answer to either one as long as you’ll let me tell you about my Redeemer and Recoverer (Moore, pp. 77-78).

Redeemed from what? Christ’s redemptive work on the cross for our sin is not explained here. And the context continues to be about our getting better.

The truth is, God uses change to change us. He doesn’t use it to destroy us or to distract us but to coax us to the next level of character, experience, compassion, and  destiny … what will ever cause us to move on to the next place He has for us if something doesn’t happen to change the way we feel about where we are? God is thoroughly committed to finishing the masterpiece He started in us (Philippians 1:6) (Moore, p. 80).

More Scripture twisting. The work God started in the people of Philippi was their participation in the gospel (Philippians 1:5). God began their salvation and He will finish it. It is NOT about changing the way we feel about where we are.

I’m simply telling you what I believe is the gospel truth: God can bring freedom and vision to your life because of those limitations that you would never have discovered without them. You can let your limitations make you either insecure or unstoppable (Moore, p. 83).

The gospel truth is that God can free you from the bondage of sin through faith in Jesus Christ. It is not about giving you vision in your life.

Life really is hard. No one can escape it. No one is unscathed by it. But we are not just flailing aimlessly in a universal back hole. There is purpose. There is order—because there is God (Moore, p. 85).

But what is the purpose? Moore needs to explain to the reader what the “purpose” is.

“He [God] knows it’s scary to be us.” Yes, beloved, He does. He does not take lightly [long paragraph of hardships and heartaches]…He knows it’s scary to be us…It’s almost too much to bear here at times, Lord. No wonder we’re insecure! The thunder crashes in the heavens, and the earth grows dark in the middle of an afternoon, and a man, beaten to a bloody pulp, cries from a cross between two thieves, “It is finished!” Because He did, one day God will wipe away ever tear from the eyes of those who trusted Him, and there will be no more death or mourning or crying or pain, for the old order of things will pass away and all our hardship will be finished (Moore, p. 86).

Yes! This is a much better explanation of where our Christian security can be found. I would quibble with saying that Jesus was just a “man.” Also, there is no discussion that Jesus “bore our sins in His body on the cross, so that we might die to sin and live to righteousness” (NASB, 1 Peter 2:24). Moore does not tie Jesus’ death on the cross back to our sin and need for a Savior. Instead it is placed among the ideas that life is scary and we are insecure.

Chapter 6: A Cocktail of Ego and Culture

This chapter focuses on the insecurity brought on by media exploitation of women in America (p. 91)

The least we can do is … look for a reasonable ethic to live by. The One who created us in His own image and then bragged about His own handiwork extends such an ethic to us, but we have to be willing to redirect our preoccupations (Moore, p. 95).

God certainly said that His work in creation (including people) was “very good” (NASB, Genesis 1:31). Of course, this was before the fall of man into sin. Having an ethic to live by and redirecting our preoccupations do not solve the sin problem.

The following quotes highlight Moore’s man-centered theology. Notice the focus is on our value, our rights, our purpose, our significance, the enormous within us, and our greatness. She claims that God is focused on us and “never takes His eyes off us.”

God has entrusted each of us—male and female—with a brief measure of time on this planet, and each season is meant to be lived abundantly, effectively, powerfully, and pricelessly. It’s our right as His prized creation (Moore, p. 95).

Try putting it [media] aside for awhile, and once you get past the initial withdrawal, see if you feel better about the person God made you to be (Moore, pp. 98-99).

We’re that desperate for significance. We live our lives screaming, “Somebody notice me!” And do you now want to hear something interesting? That’s exactly how God made us. That very need is built into our human hard drive to send us on a search for our Creator, who can assign us more significance than we can handle. He not only notices us, He never takes His eyes off us. Every now and then a moment of clarity hits us, and we feel known by something—Someone—of inestimable greatness … In the radiance of His greatness, we are made great. Our search is over and our egos silenced. We no longer need pride to drive us, because we’ve found something infinitely more fulfilling: purpose. He is the reason we are here. And finally our souls are at rest (Moore, pp. 102-104).

More important, humility is the heart of the great paradox: we find our lives when we lose them to something much larger. Perhaps the writer of Ecclesiastes had a hint of this in mind when he wrote that God “has also set eternity in the hearts of men” (Ecclesiastes 3:11). Eternity. In the hearts of mortals. It doesn’t get bigger than that. Created in the image of God, we instinctively know that something enormous is within us (Moore, p. 104).

Despite the implication of the passages above, we are not the center of God’s universe. The purpose and focus of creation, history, and the Bible is not you or me, but Jesus.

But let me tell you what isn’t complex: owning our own pride problem and confessing it to God. That’s when He’ll move it out of the way so we can deal with the roots of our insecurity we didn’t plant … Owning it is a relief. Every time I do, I sense the glorious God-given release that follows repentance (Moore, p. 106).

In trying to relieve us of the whole concept of personal sin, our culture’s reordered values have cheated us on the right to repentance and sublime restoration. They have hijacked our healing. A clear heart and a clean path are still only one sincere confession away (Moore, p. 107).

It is definitely true that our culture, and even many so-called Christian churches, have eliminated the idea of personal sin. However, confession and repentance alone will not solve the problems associated with any of our sins, including pride. We must combine them with faith in Jesus Christ for forgiveness. Moore neglects to make the necessary connection.

Chapter 7: Don’t Let It Fool You

Moore posed the question “Has insecurity ever made a fool of you?” on her blog and in this chapter reviewed the answers she received.

If we’re going to get serious about letting God deliver us, we must look in the mirror and realize how disfigured we are—far from God’s original intent for us. Until we do that, we’ll continue to settle for what we have (Moore, p. 110).

The type of language usually reserved for discussing God delivering us from sin and death is hijacked and applied to delivering us from insecurity and the problems in our lives.

When we wrap up this journey, many of you may well have decided to cooperate with divine healing (Moore, p. 110).

Are we cooperating in our salvation? Is that what is meant by diving healing?

Then one day I was walking and talking to God, and He made it clear to me that He loved me and I was placed where He wanted me (Moore, p. 123 – from a submitted blog post).

Moore’s extra-Biblical revelation has apparently spread to her followers. Rather than obtaining our security from feelings, visions, or new words from God, we should look to the Bible.

The goal of this entire book: we need to let God shovel us out of insecurity, because without Him, we’re stuck (Moore, p. 128).

I have to keep reminding myself and other women that God thinks we are beautiful no matter what. He is enthralled with our beauty (Moore, p. 131 – from a submitted blog post).

Unless He looks upon us and sees our sin. This is just more man-centered theology to feel better about ourselves.

He [God] also knows the resilience with which He made us and the innate capacity within each one of us to be restored … He knows we are not nearly as fragile as we think we are, but we will act like who we believe ourselves to be. He knows we have the capacity to be astoundingly extraordinary (Moore, pp. 142-143).

Restoration is within us? Moore continues to demonstrate her limited view of sin and mankind’s fallen nature.

He has enough security for both of us, and for those of us who call Christ Savior, He slipped His own secure Spirit within our simple jars of clay. It is in you to be secure, dear one. Do you hear what I’m saying to you? You have it in you (Moore, p. 143).

Is security innate in all people or does it come from the Holy Spirit residing within believers only? This is another example of continual confusion that Moore promotes as she switches back and forth between discussing believers and all people.

Chapter 8: A Beautiful Prize Called Dignity

Moore continues her exaltation of people in this chapter.

Insecurity is about losing our God-given dignity. The enemy of our souls loves that. He knows that people who don’t value themselves won’t think they deserve dignity. He knows that only the person who really believes God will insist on having their dignity back (Moore, p. 148).

Unfortunately, we have already seen that Moore believes this God-given dignity is in all people. How did anyone lose it? By not valuing themselves? It continues to be a muddled mess of non-Biblical teaching. She combines Biblical words, God, popular psychology and personal revelation with people who are basically good but just need a little help.

Healing something as innate as chronic insecurity takes a little time as God helps us to see where we’re broken and why…This isn’t about getting your game on. It’s about responding in a whole new way on the basis of a developing belief system…I’ve been practicing them myself for the last several months, and I am astonished by how much progress I’m experiencing (Moore, p. 149).

This is the gospel of pragmatism—try this new belief system because it works. Moore’s text reads like an infomercial. She has been practicing these techniques for several months and look at the progress she has made!

God had already brought me to the conclusion that part of any woman’s healing from insecurity inevitably involves reclaiming her God-given dignity (Moore, p. 153).

No. Our security should come from our position in Christ Jesus and the promises of Scripture, not our own dignity.

We women get a big turn on the reference to believers as “the bride of Christ” (Moore, p. 154).

In her various works, Moore regularly talks about her “romance” with Christ and her “love affair” with Christ. Yes, in the Bible the church is called the bride of Christ, but that does not mean that women get to extend that metaphor to the point that Jesus is functioning as their personal romantic love interest.

That God would highlight this verse [Proverbs 31:25] highlight this passage for our decidedly female journey was tremendously touching to me (Moore, p. 154).

And by “highlight” she means more personal revelation from God.

I’m comfortable with the unhindered gaze of God on vulnerable places in my soul because I’ve come to trust Him so much and know how deeply He loves me and accepts me (Moore, p. 154).

Accepts you just way you are? NO! We are only “accepted” by God because of the work of Christ. The Holy Spirit continues the work of sanctification to make us more like Him. If God accepted us as we were, He would not be working to change us.

We are not nearly as likely to react with the same level of insecurity when we remember how well covered we are by God (Moore, p. 155).

Yes, but this idea has not been even remotely supported by Scripture that explains what that covering means.

You are a God-clothed woman of valor and you have the privilege to wear divine strength like a garment … Scripture tells us to “put off your old self … and to put on the new self” … (Ephesians 4:22, 24) … Romans 13:14 tells us what frock we need to choose if we want to be successful: “Clothe yourselves with the Lord Jesus Christ.” There is nothing weak about Him. Pure, unadulterated power resting on your very shoulders …  If you are in Christ, you have divine power. If Christ is your Savior, sister, you are completely covered by a cloak of strength (Moore, pp. 156-157).

Again, it seems that the majority of Moore’s use of Scripture is outright abuse of the texts. The Ephesians and Romans texts are about putting off your old sinful nature and putting on the righteousness and holiness of Christ. They are not about giving you divine power and strength. These are not complicated passages to decipher—you only need to read a couple verses of context.

We have dignity precisely because God Himself gave it to us, His prized creation. You and I, along with every other human being on the planet, possess dignity because God Himself has it and He created us in His image … We are wise to note that all people have God-given dignity even if they don’t yet have eternal life through Jesus Christ (Moore, p. 159).

Yes, we should treat everyone, believers and unbelievers, with dignity. We must also teach them about their sin, the coming wrath of God, and their need for the one and only Savior, Jesus Christ.

Chapter 9: A Time and Place to Heal

This chapter was covered in detail in the book review summary above.

Chapter 10: Neither Gods Nor Devils

This chapter deals with the insecurities faced by men with the number one insecurity reported to be fear of failure (Moore, p. 185).

Once I arrived and saw the Starbucks on the first floor of the high-rise, I rested in God’s perfect will (Moore, p. 176).

Seriously? If this passage does not demonstrate the foolishness of Moore’s personal revelations from God, I cannot imagine what it would take for you to be convinced. She knew she was in living within God’s perfect will because the high-rise had a Starbucks? Would she have felt the same way if they were out of her favorite coffee blend?

The encounter between Jesus and the blind man [from Mark 8] represents exactly what can happen to you and me on an emotional level. We can “see men like trees, walking.” Not as fellow human beings (Moore, p. 197).

While not as common in this book as many of Moore’s other works, this is an example of falsely turning an historical event into an allegory and applying it to us even though there is no Biblical warrant for doing so.

Chapter 11: Eating from the Wrong Tree

This chapter provides more “practical ways” to recover our security:

A secure woman exists inside every one of us, and she’s begging to come out. In this next section, we’re going to learn practical ways to bring her to the surface (Moore, p. 203).

Women who have received Christ are sealed by God, inhabited by the Holy Spirit, and can’t be possessed by demons (Moore, p. 204).

Excellent. The Bible does make it clear that Christians are indwelt by the Holy Spirit and therefore, cannot be possessed by demons.

God graciously forgives, restores, and even resurrects as we bring Him our needs (Moore, p. 219).

Resurrects what? Things to solve our needs? If my car breaks down will God resurrect it? Using words from the Bible does not make a statement Biblical.

There is a very real and deadly demonic world in the unseen realm that we need to stand against (Moore, p. 222).

Agreed. It is good that Moore acknowledges the demonic realm. However, by relying on so much personal revelation, she endangers herself and her readers who can be deceived by the “father of lies” (NASB, John 8:44) who “disguises himself as an angel of light” (NASB, 2 Corinthians 11:14).

Within this chapter, Moore uses an extended allegory from the Garden of Eden about how we need to recognize when we are eating from the tree of life versus the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Not only is it a bad allegory that twists the Scripture, she then incorrectly applies her poor allegory:

How do you know when you’re moving from one tree to the other in your pursuit of knowledge? Usually you will be able to feel it (Moore, p. 222).

Moore is encouraging you to do exactly what Adam and Eve did in the Garden of Eden—ignore the clear word of God and trust your own feelings. No! Do not trust your feelings! Remember your heart is wicked and deceitful.

Regarding a woman who was discovering details about her husband’s sins, Moore writes:

Her colossal misstep was seeking knowledge in the dark rather than knowledge in the light. As Ephesians 4:18 says, she became “darkened in [her] understanding” instead of enlightened (Moore, p. 222).

This is more proof-texting and abusing of the Biblical text. The Ephesians text is about unbelievers who are ignorant and excluded from the life of God. It has absolutely nothing to do with seeking knowledge in the dark.

Jesus was a carpenter by trade. He can rebuild lives blown sky-high even by our own two hands (Moore, p. 225).

Really? It is His carpentry skills that come in handy when rebuilding lives?

The healing of the mind requires far more intimacy with Christ than the healing of mere bodies … Tell Him what keeps haunting you. Ask Him to grant you His own words to recite (Moore, p. 225).

Instead of following Moore’s advice, you should read the Bible and memorize the words of Jesus that are contained there. Why ask Him to provide different words through special revelation when we already have His clear Word—the Bible?

Chapter 12: Through the Eyes of the Guys

This chapter discusses men’s views of women’s insecurities as conveyed to Moore through replies to questions on her blog.

If we’re in Christ, we already have a second nature that is not remotely insecure (Moore, p. 232).

Even as believers we can continue to struggle with our security. We can even struggle with security about our salvation.

The only definitive and enduring motivation for a true transformation in our security will be God Himself. The Creator of heaven and earth assigned us dignity and immeasurable value, and only when we finally accept those inalienable truths will we discover authentic security (Moore, p. 238).

NO! Only when we have salvation through the shed blood of Jesus Christ will we have authentic security.

Through Him [Christ] we have acquired the human unction upon which every life pivots: the power to choose (Moore, p. 238).

Our ability to choose is not the pivot point of our life. Adam and Eve were created without a sinful nature and their power to choose messed up everything for them and us. My power to choose is now mangled by sin, so I think this will end badly for me if left to my own power. Thankfully, I rest in Ephesians 1:4 that states “He [God the Father] chose us in Him [Jesus] before the foundation of the world, that we would be holy and blameless before Him” (NASB). Our lives pivot on God’s choice, not ours.

Chapter 13: The Power to Choose

This chapter is a mix of discussion of Moore’s views of free will, humanity’s ability to make choices about our security and also how to come to Christ.

The most prized possession God gave humankind when He formed Adam from the dust of the earth was the power to choose. Nowhere do we bear the image of our Creator more forthrightly than in the ability to exercise our free will (Moore, p. 239).

Moore does not support her assertion about our free will with Scripture. Did Adam and Eve best demonstrate that they bore the image of God when they freely chose to sin?

We can make a deliberate choice to refuse insecurity the space to see. Every person created in the image of God has the right to choose, but those of us who have received Christ’s own Spirit also possess the concentrated strength to exercise that right (Moore, p. 240).

What does it mean to have the right to choose, but not the strength? Imagine a paralyzed person who has the right to choose to walk, but not the strength to do so. Will they walk? Likewise, imagine an unbeliever who has the right to choose to repent of their sin and receive Christ as their Savior, but does not have the necessary strength to do so. Will they be saved?

If a woman doesn’t have the Spirit of Christ within her enabling her to do what she can’t, the pressure will prove too much and her strength too small (Moore, p. 241).

Does this apply to her ability to choose to ask Christ to come into her life? Moore writes a lot of lengthy books, but she has not fully thought out the consequences of the ideas she is presenting. I am not trying to take a stand here on the debatable Christian issue of human free will, but rather pointing out Moore’s inconsistencies in these areas.

If you do not have a personal relationship with Christ, I’m not trying to manipulate you, pressure you, or worm you into some kind of cult. My life’s passion is to see women like you really live and truly thrive. No matter how our beliefs may differ, you were created in the image of God and therefore possess a dignity that deserves my respect. I joyfully and unhesitatingly give it. You all possess the God-given free will to choose Christ or not, and regardless of what you decide, I’m grateful you came along on this journey … You can still find help within these pages, and I encourage you to see it to the end (Moore, pp. 241-242).

An unbeliever “can still find help within these pages” (Moore, p. 242)? This would seem to imply that even unbelievers can have security. On what basis? Also, what does it mean for an unbeliever to “really live and truly thrive”?

If you’re not a believer in Christ, you can ask Him to come into your life this moment as your Lord and Savior, and you will instantly and permanently possess the diving power inside of you that I’m talking about—and eternal life besides. If you’re interested, look in the back of this book for the page entitled “So, You’re Considering Christ” and I’ll walk you through the simple steps. It will take all of five minutes. What happens if you do? The moment you receive Him, His Spirit takes up residency inside and you possess what the Bible calls “all-surpassing power” in “jars of clay” (2 Corinthians 4:7) I’ve encountered this supernatural unction countless times, knowing even in the moment that God was enabling me to do something that I was totally incapable of doing in my natural strength. It’s a high like no other high. It has also made my lows so very less low (Moore, p. 242).

Follow these simple steps and in only five minutes you too can have divine power, supernatural unction, and a high like no other. Those are not the promises of the Biblical gospel. This is dangerous and misleading. Moore is presenting a false version of Christianity—which serves the purposes of Satan.

Moore then teaches additional techniques including the idea that we should think the thought that “you cannot have my security” (Moore, p. 244). After presenting the techniques, Moore made the following statements:

Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it. Give it one week, and you won’t believe how divinely empowered you feel (Moore, p. 245).

These are simply more steps for getting divine power if you just follow her formula. This is the gospel of pragmatism—i.e. Christian works for me so you should try it for yourself.

The power to choose is so inherently God-given that Scripture raises a gigantic red flag over people who make us feel so weak we can’t make a sound decision. Second Timothy 3:6 spits the truth right out on the page: “They are the kind [of people] who worm their way into homes and gain control over weak-willed women, and who are loaded down with sins and are swayed by all kinds of evil desires” (Moore, p. 246).

Paul describes such [an emotional] predator as having “a form of godliness but denying its power” (2 Timothy 3:5). Please hear this part with both ears: we are also explicitly told to “have nothing to do with them” (Moore, p. 248).

Paul is not writing about emotional predators “who make us feel so weak we can’t make a sound decision.” He is writing about sinful men who oppose the truth, are of depraved mind, and reject the faith. Moore again demonstrates her inability to rightly interpret Scripture.

Agape is a kind of love that is in another person’s best interest (Moore, p. 255)

This is a minor error compared to the hundreds of others, but in Luke 11:43, Jesus uses the term agape when He scolds the Pharisees for their love: “Woe to you Pharisees! For you love [agape] the chief seats in the synagogues and the respectful greetings in the market places” (NASB). John 3:19 states “men loved [agape] the darkness rather than the Light, for their deeds were evil” (NASB). Agape is merely a Greek word for love. Like the English word ‘love,’ ‘agape’ can have both positive and negative connotations based upon the context.

Chapter 14: Can We Do It for Them?

I am so taken with Jesus and so convinced that abundance is in His wake alone precisely because He has done so much to heal me (Moore, p. 269).

This sounds like the prosperity gospel’s false promises of abundance and healing. Many passages of the New Testament warn of the trials and sufferings that believers may experience on account of their faith. See 1 Peter 4:12, Acts 14:22, Philippians 1:29, 2 Timothy 3:12, and 1 John 3:13

Chapter 15: Looking Out for Each Other

This chapter is focused on how women can “start helping each other out” in dealing with insecurity.

The insecurities of women have gone viral, and as if our culture is not host enough, now we’re catching it from each other. Call me an optimist, but I have to believe that security could be just as contagious (Moore, p. 278).

Moore teaches women to not compare themselves to other women as this supposedly leads to more insecurity. Moore employs the following two texts from to support her idea:

We will not compare ourselves with each other as if one of us were better and another worse. We have far more interesting things to do with our lives. Each of us is an original. Galatians 5:26, The Message (Moore, p. 283).

the vicious habit of depersonalizing everyone into a rival” Galatians 5:21, The Message (Moore, p. 283).

Contrary to Moore’s claim, Peterson’s book, The Message, is not on target and cannot even be considered a translation! The Message is a corruption of the original, inspired Biblical text. Galatians 5 is about the deeds of the flesh versus the deeds of the Spirit. It is not about eliminating our insecurities by not comparing ourselves to others and depersonalizing our rivals. Moore has used these verses from The Message as proof texts to make her desired point.

We have this treasure! We are aflame with God’s glory and radiating with the light of His knowledge in the exquisite face of His Son, Jesus Christ. And we’re insecure? … We, of all people on the earth, possess the reason, the residence, and the ongoing revelation to be, of all things, most secure (Moore, p. 293).

Absolutely correct. Unfortunately, burying that in a couple of sentences on page 293 does not undo the damage done on the rest of the 368 pages.

Chapter 16: A Passion to Look Past Ourselves

Moore’s stated goal in this chapter was to “reiterate what we can expect to hear shouted from the world and learn how to actively offset our addiction to listen” (Moore, p. 298).

This book is built on one major premise: try as we might, we are not likely to change our culture. But we can let God change us, and vital change will happen within our culture (Moore, p. 309).

The true Gospel can radically change lives and cultures, but Moore’s self-help plus God’s help to be a better person still leaves people as lost and fallen sinners who are without hope and no real security.

A fire burns in me to see women of all ages and colors freed and flourishing in Christ, because I’ve know the anguish of bondage and abuse (Moore, p. 310).

It is truly tragic that Moore was abused as a child. Her desire to help other people who go through similar abuse is commendable. However, the Bible never promises that people who are in Christ will be free from bondage and abuse from other people. On the contrary, the believers during the New Testament church period were beaten, tortured, and martyred because of their faith. Moore is peddling a modified version of the prosperity gospel. She may not be selling health and wealth, but she is selling freedom from troubles such as insecurity.

Your past has not come full circle to its complete redemption until you allow Christ to not only defuse it, but also to use it … I’m simply proposing that the only reason God allowed all that pain in your path, as much as He loved you, was to bring good from it. Have you offered Him the freedom to work all those hardships together for good as He promises in His Word to those who love Him and see to fulfill His purposes? … People out there need help. And you have something inside you that needs to help them. So do I. It’s the way our souls were built (Moore, pp. 311-312).

Again Moore hijacks the Biblical idea of redemption—Christ’s redemptive work on the cross—and applies it to her ideas about using past hurts to help others. While it is commendable that she wants to help others, there is no Biblical support for her claim that “you have something inside you that needs to help them” because that is “the way our souls were built” (Moore, p. 312).

He [husband Keith] wrote a check to a charity … [because he] has lived long enough to know that the more selfish he is, the more miserable he becomes. The greedier he is, the less secure he feels. If he feels like hoarding, he knows he needs to give something away … We have watched our children also pour their passions into the needs of people … [and] board a plane en route to the remotest parts of the world and stare poverty in its ugly face (Moore, p. 313).

Melissa [her daughter] didn’t just want to care. She knew that deep within her soul, she needed to care. She realized that, just like the rest of us, she’d never be healed of her self-centeredness until she was wounded irreparably with love for an aching world. To help others would become life to her own lungs (Moore, p. 317).

Giving to charities and taking mission trips can be wonderful activities, but Moore ties these to supposed needs of our souls that are not supported by the Bible. It all sounds very spiritual, but that does not make it Biblical.

Chapter 17: What Are You Afraid Of?

This chapter is focused on facing our fears and trusting God to help us overcome them.

There’s a powerful pair of words. Trust God. Plain and simple. Not easy, mind you, but basic and uncomplicated. You don’t always have to hash it all out. Sometimes you can make a single swift decision. As Christ said to a wavering disciple, you just have to make up your splintered mind to “stop doubting and believe” (John 20:27) (Moore, p. 320).

Here, Moore abuses the great narrative of “doubting” Thomas’ encounter with the risen Lord Jesus. She applies this command as a directive to believe that God will help us overcome our fears. The real context is to believe that Jesus has risen from the grave, that He is God in flesh, and that He has conquered sin and death.

I used to think that the essence of trusting God was trusting that He wouldn’t allow my fears to become realities. Without realizing it, I mostly trusted God to do what I told him (Moore, p. 323).

This is actually a pretty good statement. We probably all fall into this trap at times.

The most repetitive command God gives His people in the entire stretch of Scripture is “Do not fear!” (Moore, p. 331).

However, the meaning of those “do not fear” statements varies quite a bit based upon the context.

Chapter 18: A Clean Escape

This is a rambling chapter trying to close things up. The chapter ends with what she calls a “maintenance prayer” to be used to maintain your security. Moore also calls a Roman Catholic nun a “fellow Christian”:

One of them [friends] is Sister Lynn. In this case, “Sister” isn’t just a figure of speech for a fellow Christian. Lynn is a real, live sister in the ecumenical sense of the world. She and her merry group of social networkers are nuns (Moore, p. 340).

It appears that Moore is not aware of the Protestant Reformation and the reasons why Protestants separated from and rejected the false gospel of the Roman Catholic Church. People who believe the false gospel of faith plus works as taught by the Roman Catholic Church are not Christians.

Appendix: So, You’re Considering Christ

The appendix is Moore’s explanation of how to come to saving faith in Jesus Christ:

I could have no greater privilege in all of life than introducing you to a saving relationship with Jesus Christ through a simple prayer you fill with your faith (Moore, p. 347).

Jesus already spent the time, energy, and unimaginable turmoil when He went to the cross. All you’re asked to do is receive the gift He has placed with unbridled affection before you (Moore, pp. 347-348).

Once you’ve accepted His gift of grace, you don’t need to ever doubt your salvation again. Your eternal condition is not based on how you feel from day to day. Stand steadfastly on what you know. The very moment you accept Christ as your Savior, you receive His Spirit. Once He resides within you, He will never leave or forsake you. When you die, you will awaken immediately to brand-new life in a glorious Kingdom, where you will be more alive than you ever dreamed of being on earth. Let this matter be settled once and for all. Knowing that nothing and no one, including you, can sabotage your salvation (Moore, p. 348).

Say these words to God … consider saying them from your knees to help sanctify this moment (Moore, p. 349).

Father of heaven and earth, thank you for sending Your son, to die for all my sins—past, present, and future. Today … I receive Your gift of grace, turn from my own destructive ways, and accept Your Son as my personal Savior. I believe with my heart and confess with my mouth that Jesus Christ is Lord. Lead me daily to fulfill my destiny. Flood me with Your Spirit. Empower me to do the impossible. Today the matter is settled. I am Yours, and You are mine. In Jesus’ delivering name, Amen (Moore, p. 349).

If you prayed that prayer with a willing, sincere heart, you have just become a child of God. Your eternity is secured, and your salvation is complete and absolute (Moore, p. 349).

This is not the worst example of a generic “sinner’s prayer” that might be used at an altar call. It is a little vague and missing discussion on some key points including a definition of sin, the need for repentance, and God’s justice and wrath. For example, why did Jesus need to die for my sins? Also, Moore adds in ideas like “lead me daily to fulfill my destiny” and “empower me to do the impossible” that sound like New Age spirituality. Thankfully, perfect theology is not a requirement for someone to come to saving faith in Jesus Christ. But, after so many years of public ministry, teaching, and books, one might expect Moore to have developed a better explanation of sin, repentance, faith, and the gospel.

References

Moore, Beth. So Long, Insecurity: You’ve Been a Bad Friend to Us. Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. First Edition, February 2, 2012. Hardback,,368 pages. ISBN-13: 978-1414334721.

New American Standard Bible, Lockman Foundation, 1995.

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