Everybody’s in, baby? Making molehills out of mountains – Part 7

In today’s installment, we continue our review of the blog article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On. If you would like to start back at the beginning of this series, here are the links to parts 1, 2, 3, 4 , 5 and 6. The author now begins to give us her interpretation of being born again:

What we do understand is that we are reborn. And here is what I believe it means to be reborn: The first time you’re born, you identify the people in the room as your family. The second time you’re born, you identify the whole world as your family. Christianity is not about joining a particular club; it’s about waking up to the fact that we are all in the same club. Every last one of us. So avoid discussions about who’s in and who’s out at all costs. Everybody’s in, baby. That’s what makes it beautiful. And hard. If working out your faith is not beautiful and hard, find a new one to work out (Glennon, emphasis in original).

That is not Christianity, but universalism (the idea that everyone goes to heaven). It is not worship of God, but worship of self. It is not believing in the real Jesus presented to us in the Bible, but believing in a make believe Jesus. That is not what Jesus taught about being born again (see John chapter 3 for that). The real Jesus taught about the eternal fires of hell:

And if your hand or your foot causes you to sin, cut it off and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life crippled or lame than with two hands or two feet to be thrown into the eternal fire. And if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away. It is better for you to enter life with one eye than with two eyes to be thrown into the hell of fire (Matthew 18:8-9).

If “everybody’s in, baby” as Glennon claims, why did Jesus teach that many people will find destruction while few will find eternal life?

Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few (Matthew 7:13-14).

The reason Jesus taught about sin and repentance is because he believed that God’s judgment and wrath are real. And, because he believed God’s judgment and wrath are real, he was willing to die on the cross to redeem his people. And despite Glennon’s claim, not everyone is getting in to heaven. Do you want to believe Glennon or Jesus? And, I mean the real Jesus of the Bible, not some blond-haired, blue-eyed, surfer Jesus (h/t Matt Slick).

Glennon also tells you that you can put your faith in anything:

If working out your faith is not beautiful and hard, find a new one [faith] to work out (Glennon).

But our salvation is not about our faith, but what we put our faith in. Over the years, my pastor has given the analogy of walking out on an ice-covered lake. It does not matter one bit how strong my faith is in that ice. My faith will not hold me up. If I put my rock-solid, unwavering faith in ice that is thin, I will fall through. But, if I put my weak, trembling faith in ice that is thick, I will be supported. It is not our faith that saves us, but what we put our faith in. If we put our faith in a false Jesus, we will not be saved.

Finally for today, Glennon encourages us not to fear:

And if spiritual teachers are encouraging you to fear anyone, watch them closely, honey (Glennon).

The Bible teaches us that “the fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom” (Psalm 111:10). Jesus taught that we should definitely fear:

And do not fear those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul. Rather fear him who can destroy both soul and body in hell.

Jesus warned us to fear the false prophets who bring a false message from God:

Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing but inwardly are ravenous wolves (Matthew 7:15).

The Apostle Peter warned us that there will be false teachers:

But false prophets also arose among the people, just as there will be false teachers among you, who will secretly bring in destructive heresies, even denying the Master who bought them, bringing upon themselves swift destruction. And many will follow their sensuality, and because of them the way of truth will be blasphemed (2 Peter 2:1-2).

As this series has repeatedly shown, the article A Mountain I’m Willing to Die On repeatedly blasphemes Jesus and the true gospel. Do not be deceived by these lies. I want you to fear false teachers who bring these false doctrines of universalism. Be very afraid, because your very soul and all eternity is at stake.

Closing remarks tomorrow. In the meantime, go read all of 2 Peter 2 and hear the strong language Peter uses about false teachers. Is that message at all consistent with Glennon’s claim that “everybody’s in, baby”?

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